How To Do The Cholesterol Drop, Step by Step

After several have approached me both on and offline about it, I’ve decided to make a page that lays out my experiment and how you can do it to.

And once again, PLEASE keep close track of your data and share your results, whatever they are. The more people who do this, the more data we have.

highspeeddrop_justthenumbers

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Ferro Silvio
Ferro Silvio
3 years ago

1) I’m going for the 10,5 day test. But after the filled with “social events” end of this year. Results coming mid or end of January 2017…
2) I can’t find an NMR cholesterol test in Belgium (the country). I found Belgium,WI as an existing city :). Do you have any knowledge of a lab in Belgium doing these?
3) Unable to send private twitter messages, did you block that on purpose or am I doing something wrong?

Ferro Silvio
Ferro Silvio
3 years ago
Reply to  Dave

1) You mention that you and the others that did the test allready are on an LC diet. So I was thinking to start with 2 weeks of “normal” LC. Because the end of year I’m cheating a lot. Anyway, why didn’t you do a baseline bloodtest before the experiment? I will do one before the start of the test, and If I start with 2 weeks of “normal” LC, I will do a test before starting that too.

2) still googlin. hsCRP can be done I our lab.

3) @Silfergold

Hyper-Responder Bill
3 years ago

Dave,

How important is it to do the whole 3 days of high fat/high calorie intake before the blood test? I attempted this test but could only stomach the first 2 days of the high fat/high caloric diet & the results were not an ‘improvement’ test result-wise. Is one normal diet day & a 14 hr fast the next day before the test enough to turn that LDL-C & LDL-P completely around? I expected a sizable reduction in LDL since I did 2 of 3 days (like 2/3 of a reduction in LDL).

btw for almost 3 yrs now, my LDL-P numbers have been >2000 since switching to a (mostly) keto diet. It’s been off the charts (>3500) for ~ 1 year now. All the other numbers on the NMR look spectacular except for the LDL particle number.

Hyper-Responder Nev
Hyper-Responder Nev
3 years ago

Hi Dave,

Let me first mention that this is such amazing work. I’m in the same boat where my LDL-C (upto 700) + LDL-P (>3500) shot up on a keto-genic diet (despite feeling and functioning great). I tried lot of things like a.) adding probiotics, b.) adding upto 50-80gms carbs, c.) and off and on tried statin + ezitembe too. Only thing that worked were medications.

I just had a few questions/observations on your work/experiments

1. You did manage to drop your LDL ingesting high amounts of fat but obviously most days your fat intake will be lower. This means, for the most part you will have a high LDL-P count. Personally, are you comfortable with a high LDL-P on a keto-genic diet?

2. You seem to have gotten a 1000 pt drop in LDL-P. If we assume this scales linearly, for this to work with my numbers i probably would to ingest an obscene amount of fat!

If you think you can give me few good pointers i would love for you to have a quick look at my NMRs + other blood markers (over email or phone). I too have had quite a few over the last few years, and nothing excites me more than getting that extra data point of information (or blood test). Also, let me know if you plan to start some kind of forum/group/face-book page where we could share our readings/experiments etc.

Jake
Jake
3 years ago

Dave – I am interested in trying out this experiment on myself, and was wondering if you could give an example menu of what you ate on your High Days. I currently eat following macros I calculated on Ketogains (protein at 165g +/- 20g, NET carbs less than 25g, and fat g to ensure satiety…….about 90g/day). I am 6′ tall and weigh 178lbs (pretty consistent at that weight for last 4 weeks or so).

When I look at your fat consumption on High Days I am blown away, and feel like I would struggle mightily to own that many calories. I was hoping to se what you consumed so that I could gauge my likely success on following something similar. Thanks in advance for your time AND for this awesome work you are doing!

Krista
Krista
3 years ago

I just finished watching your interview with Luis on Ketogains. I found it encouraging for my own situation. Since April 2016 I have lost 69 pounds following Ketogains macros and have reached my goal weight of 145 pounds. (Female 5’4”, 55 years-old). Feeling energized, fit and fantastic I visited my family doctor for an annual checkup. Everything looked great: good BMI, BP 122/77. Most of my bloodwork was also good: A1C 5.3, HDL 52, TG 96. And then the dreaded high LDL of 247. Predictably, my doctor was alarmed and suggested familial hypercholesterolemia (it seems unlikely as I have no history of heart disease in my family and both my parents are 80 years-old). She is in favour of lowering carbs, but proceeded to hand me a fact sheet on lowering fat consumption by switching butter out for margarine, and choosing lean meats :(. After watching your video I went and checked my own spreadsheet where I have religiously tracked my daily macros since April. Sure enough, for 4 days prior to my bloodwork I had purposefully lowered both my calorie and fat intake in preparation for the test. In fact, I had fasted completely from food for 22 hours preceding the test. I have more bloodwork scheduled for March and I will prepare differently this time by substantially increasing my fat intake for a few days prior to the test. I don’t have anything to lose as I will not take statins at this point no matter what the LDL results are. I’ll let you know the results.

Shawn
3 years ago

PK

extreme boobs
3 years ago

I couldn’t resist commenting. Perfectly written!

Stewart Sy
Stewart Sy
2 years ago

I just got my blood work done. I’m in Canada so units are metric. I tried the 3 day protocol and my triglycerides went from 12.9 to 12.3. I’m seeing my Dr. this week and he’s of the traditional belief of lower the better. Not sure what to do now. lol

Siobhan Huggins
Admin
2 years ago
Reply to  Stewart Sy

Your *triglycerides* are 12.3 mmol/L? That is definitely something I would want to address, as soon as I could if I were in your shoes. What did your diet look like before the test?

Stewart Sy
Stewart Sy
2 years ago

I started on a ketogenic diet early May of this year, that was the first draw and it was 12.9, then on Monday it was 12.3. Essentially on straight keto, Fats, greens, macadamia nuts and of course proteins. Maybe some carbs once or twice a week in the form of maybe a slice of pizza, fleshy fruits like peach etc. Before keto, my TG was 6. However, my A1C did drop from 7.6 to 6.2 from May to August. Before keto, was on a lower carb diet but I still had fruits like apples, grapes and such.

Siobhan Huggins
Admin
2 years ago
Reply to  Stewart Sy

It could be that the higher fat of keto plus occasional carbs may be creating an unsavory mix that’s resulting in poor trig results. Carb leaks or higher carb plus higher fat is one of the possibilities that may result in higher trigs… To catch any other suspects you may want to look at this list and troubleshoot to see what it is that’s causing such high triglycerides.

Jeff Braddy
Jeff Braddy
2 years ago

I’m confused. After I do the cholesterol drop with success, then what? Am I supposed to continue to eat 5000 calories a day?

Siobhan Huggins
Admin
2 years ago
Reply to  Jeff Braddy

It’s more of a way to demonstrate that LDL is heavily influenced by dietary patterns (specifically fat intake, and energy source e.g. fat vs glucose), and easily manipulated – meaning that it may be heavily context dependent (as high cholesterol could be caused by other factors like underlying illness, or chronic conditions) as far as risk goes. To see why that’s especially relevant in low carbers you could check here.

Bruce Berry
Bruce Berry
1 year ago

Here’s where I’m stuck: chronically higher fat => more Trigs in transit => higher LDL needed (LMH story). So why does a sudden increase in Fat (Trigs) *reduce* the number of carriers ? (according to this theory) Is it is because more of these “carriers” shifted into the VLDL stage, which has a 2-3 day lifetime? (In which case the “drop” will reverse once bolus of trigs clears ?) If so, seems to assume/indicate a maximum to the lipoprotein creation rate – which you can overwhelm in the short term.

Bruce Berry
Bruce Berry
1 year ago
Reply to  Bruce Berry

I think Dave speculates on this in an earlier answer #4257 “There’s just a few of us that think the same thing as I do. That cholesterol is the red herring. That mostly, this is due to higher demand for fat-based energy coming from storage in the form of triglycerides being carried by VLDLs. The cholesterol being measured resides in those VLDL-originating LDL particles, which is why it’s quantity is inverted from the total amount of dietary fat I eat.

More fat in my low carb diet? Less need for fat-based energy from storage, less VLDLs mobilized, less cholesterol riding along with it. Lower cholesterol score.

Less fat in my low carb diet? More need for fat-based energy from storage, more VLDLs mobilized, more cholesterol ridding along with it. Higher cholesterol score.”

I thought VLDL carried trigs from all sources (diet and storage) so increasing dietary fat would also increase the need for VLDL carriers.

Jean-Luc
Jean-Luc
1 year ago

Hi there,
I would like to understand what is the purpose of the 12-14 hour fast before the blood test. I had plan my 3 days high fat intake perfectly with 6000+ of high fat days and I am now on day 4 but started the day thinking I was on day 3… typical me… So now I just had a 2000 calories breakfast and going to do my blood work shortly… I guess I will find out what the purpose of fasting is, but still would like to get DF scientific explanation.
Cheers!

Siobhan Huggins
Admin
1 year ago
Reply to  Jean-Luc

Going in without fasting properly can result in inaccurate results including higher than normal triglycerides, remnants, insulin, glucose, and possibly LDL.
Going in fasted too long can result in higher than normal LDL, higher trigs, lower HDL and some others.

You get data capturing you trafficking fat you just ate, and it might interfere with the results of the protocol.

Gary Loyd
Gary Loyd
7 months ago

Last week was my annual “Biometric Screening” at work. My employer tosses $250 into my HSA for doing this. I decided to try the 6.5 day protocol. I stopped drinking coffee. Here are my results:

First 3 days averages:
CAL 1436, FAT 32%, CARB 30%, PROTEIN 38%
February 23 Lipids test using Everlywell home test ($45):
TOT 225, TRI 89, HDL 64, LDL 92

Second 3 days averages:
CAL 3686, FAT 47%, CARB 15%, PROTEIN 39%
February 26 Biometric Screening (at work – instant results)
TOT 189, TRI 45, HDL 58, LDL unavailable (the tech said when triglycerides are this low the machine won’t even calculate ldl.)

Main thing I learned: too many carbs in things I consume regularly!

Siobhan Huggins
Admin
7 months ago
Reply to  Gary Loyd

Thanks for sharing back your results! One thing I have noticed people comment on is that they sometimes don’t really know what exactly they’re eating until they decide to track their baseline for an experiment! Seems you ran into the same thing. 🙂

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