«

»

Oct 29

Help Us Fund the Lean Mass Hyper-responder Measurement Project

Click here to support the project

Greetings everyone,

On Friday at Low Carb Houston, I announced the launch of the Citizen Science Foundation, a vehicle for helping us privately raise funds for its central endeavor, the Lean Mass Hyper-responder Measurement Project.

The Lean Mass Hyper-responder (LMHR) phenotype is a strong profile to test the lipid hypothesis, which posits levels of cholesterol in the blood are linked to the development of heart disease. The cut point for LDL cholesterol starts as 200 mg/dL (5.17 mmol/L) and higher, with many having levels well into the 400s and 500s:

  • LDL-C ≥ 200 mg/dL (5.17 mmolL)
  • Typically LDL-P ≥ 2,000 nmol/L

Yet they commonly have very low cardiovascular risk markers across the board:

  • High HDL cholesterol
  • Low Triglycerides
  • Low Insulin levels
  • Low waist-to-hip ratio
  • Low blood pressure
  • Low Inflammatory Markers
  • Low HOMA-IR

Moreover, most LMHRs who report having done their genetic testing have confirmed little to no connection with Familial Hypercholesterolemia. (For more on LMHRs, visit here)

Asking the Community to Help Us Advance Science

The Lean Mass Hyper-responder Measurement Project will help to match a portion of LMHRs with advanced testing they could otherwise get on their own through their doctor — but can be costly.

  • Such metrics may include wide spectrum blood panels and cardiovascular testing such as CT Angiogram, Carotid Intima Media Thickness (CIMT), and Coronary Artery Calcium (CAC) score.
  • For those who have little to no detectable atherosclerotic risk at baseline, we would seek to capture their data again in five years with the same tests for a comparison.
  • LMHRs who participate are not in any way asked to take any treatment action now or in the future. And any medical decisions made are between themselves and their doctor.
  • Note that participants will likely need to travel to the location where the initial baseline tests taken, and potentially again in five years. This ensures greater comparison between participants and negotiating a better price for the tests involved through bulk rates. The exact tests and host facilities are still being worked out and will depend on how much we raise.

Again, for emphasis — this wouldn’t be a study itself, it’s a project to help capture this data for LMHRs and provide the opportunity for them to share it for science. That said, it could set up future opportunities for retrospectives studies, and we are confident it would be of great interest to the general public, especially the low carb community.

Click here to support the project

5
Leave a Reply

avatar
 
Photo and Image Files
 
 
 
Audio and Video Files
 
 
 
Other File Types
 
 
 
3 Comment threads
2 Thread replies
0 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
4 Comment authors
Siobhan HugginsBob NilandSonia TaylorJoey Recent comment authors

  Subscribe  
newest oldest most voted
Notify of
Joey
Guest
Joey

Just contributed to the cause. Best wishes for pushing science along in the direction of facts.

Sonia Taylor
Guest
Sonia Taylor

Dave I was not sure how to contact you regarding this. I have some blood work that i received yesterday (and from last year also) that I think you would be very interested. I am definitely a lean mass hyper responder and would love some feed back. LDL yesterday was 659 for example. Thank you for your help. Have a great day.

Siobhan Huggins
Admin

Hi – you could post the results on this site in a comment for him to see, or you could use the contact page if you are interested about the measurement project. Although we won’t be looking for participants until the funding is finalized. Another option is joining the Lean Mass Hyper-responder facebook page – as it’s likely that updates would be posted there as well.

Bob Niland
Guest
Bob Niland

Low Triglycerides is listed twice. Is something missing?

Might I propose NMR Small LDL-P? (also missing)

Siobhan Huggins
Admin

Ah, thanks for pointing that out! I’ll be sure that is fixed. 🙂
As for the small LDL-P, what’s listed is just a sampling of commonalities between LMHRs, not an exhaustive list. I’m sure there are many more that we’ve missed!