«

»

Jan 23

Guest Post – Impact of Coffee on Triglycerides

Note from Dave: Sean is a prolific member of the LMHR Facebook Group and I was keen to share this remarkable experiment with you all as a guest post here. Enjoy!

My name is Sean Brennan and I have been on a ketogenic diet for 14 months now, beginning on Thanksgiving of 2017.  It has been awesome – 35 pounds melted away in the first 6 months and I have a more stable mood, better digestion, resolved eczema, and have more control over my appetite. 

Unfortunately, I did not do a baseline blood test prior to the diet, however, I found a blood test from 2011, while I was eating a High Carb Low Fat/Standard American Diet. I was probably eating a vegan diet at that time: total cholesterol was at 191 mg/dL and HDL at 38 mg/dL.

Test #2 – Unexpected High Trigs  

I had read that if you are in the middle of losing weight you could skew your blood test, so I waited until my weight stabilized to get testing done. Back when I was eating a vegan diet several years ago, I became aware that saturated fat increased my cholesterol. I had tested around 240 mg/dL (the horror!) and I promptly decreased my coconut oil (high saturated fat) intake and saw my number drop to 165 mg/dL.  So, when my initial test came back after a keto way of eating with a total cholesterol of 313 mg/dL, I was not surprised.  However, I was very surprised at my triglyceride reading of 131 mg/dL. 

Typically, on a ketogenic diet it is expected that triglycerides drop like a stone due to the limited carbohydrate intake.  In fact, many people will have a triglyceride to HDL ratio approaching 1:1.  So, I was a little concerned that my ratio was 131:47 or 2.79:1.

Looking For Answers

Thankfully, I was aware of cholesterolcode.com and Dave and Siobhan’s work.  I promptly became a member of their Facebook group for Lean Mass Hyper-responders, and asked for advice regarding my numbers.  Siobhan directed me to a blog post for people who likewise had high triglycerides while on a Low Carb High Fat diet.

Of the suggestions listed, the only one that stood out to me as a possibility was a coffee sensitivity. Prior to test #3, I had 1-3 cups of coffee per day for several months.  So, I decided to cut it out and retest.

Test #3, #4, & #5 – No Coffee  

Somewhat painfully, I was able to cut out coffee for four days prior to test #3.  My triglyceride test result was 76 mg/dL, a dramatic decline from 131 mg/dL!  Better yet, my trig:HDL ratio was 76:51 or 1.49:1.  I was a happy camper!  I maintained my coffee abstinence and achieved similar, if not slightly improving triglyceride results, for test #4 & #5 of 71 & 70, respectively.

Test #6 & #7, Back on Coffee

To confirm the effect of coffee on my triglycerides, I drank a cup of black, French press prepared coffee on two consecutive days and re-tested.  My trigs effectively doubled back up to 140 mg/dL!  For test #7, I drank filtered coffee for a week and saw similar results of 147 mg/dL.

Test #8 & #9 – Decaf Result

I abstained for another week and predictably my triglycerides fell back to 63 mg/dL.  For one final test, I drank decaf for a week and interestingly saw my triglycerides climb back up to 125 mg/dL.

To Sum It All Up…

So, it is clear to me that unfiltered, filtered, and decaf coffee dramatically raise my triglycerides by a factor of 2.  This is quite the effect, although I really am not sure why this happens or if it is harmful (though it definitely makes me uncomfortable). 

Summary of the changes Sean saw.

Dave suggested that there is some evidence to support the hypothesis that coffee increases lipolysis, that is, it possibly super charges fat trafficking. Another interesting tidbit of information is that I have a gene (CYP1A2 – rs762551(A;C)) that indicates slow caffeine metabolism – although this may or may not be related.

Where to Go From Here?

What do I plan to do with this information?  Well, it has been theorized that while eating a low carbohydrate diet, high total and LDL cholesterol may not be harmful especially if one’s trig to HDL ratio is low.  I am comfortable living by this theory, and therefore, I think it is in my best interest to keep triglycerides low by greatly reducing coffee intake (and maintaining my low carb lifestyle).  I don’t think there will be a net loss to my well-being, since coffee tends to lower my energy after the initial bump, boost my stress hormones, negatively affect my digestion, and sometimes interferes with my sleep quality.  So, as the reasons stack up against coffee for me, I plan to only have it as an occasional treat or productivity boost. 

148
Leave a Reply

avatar
 
Photo and Image Files
 
 
 
Audio and Video Files
 
 
 
Other File Types
 
 
 
57 Comment threads
91 Thread replies
10 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
72 Comment authors
AndrewSiobhan HugginsAdamMariaRobin Recent comment authors

  Subscribe  
newest oldest most voted
Notify of
Dustin
Guest
Dustin

Very interesting thank you! Do you think the mechanism is related to caffeine directly, or perhaps some other compound found in coffee? I am a heavy tea drinker with low trig, but I can’t stand the taste/smell of coffee otherwise I would experiment myself. Also I believe tea typically has much less caffeine than coffee does.

Mark Walker
Guest
Mark Walker

Yes we drink tea and coffee. Tea also contains caffeine. Any volunteers with home monitor for conducting a trigs test for tea? Just as important as coffee!

Annlee
Guest
Annlee

https://www.snpedia.com/index.php/Rs762551
I’m CC, and find a difference in pulse (-4-5bpm) and BP (-10-12 points, diastolic and systolic) when I eschew coffee. It may increase my TG some, but I find my level of exercise a bigger factor.

YMMV, of course.

Sarat V
Guest
Sarat V

I also have (CYP1A2 – rs762551(A;C)), but my last TG in Dec was 74. 2-3 cups of coffee a day. So, that may not have anything to do with it. On Keto for 9 months with stable weight in Dec. TC 242, TG 74, HDL 66, LDL 161. I am not sure if I am “lean”, but the meter at the gym says my BF % is 16.

Robin Privett
Member
Robin Privett

Check your Lp(a).. you may have it.

Ken S
Guest
Ken S

Would love to see people do similar tests using a third group: decaf coffee. Is it the coffee bean, or caffeine?

Sandra Carusetta
Guest
Sandra Carusetta

This is a helpful post! Thanks for the article. (Just FYI, I think he means Thanksgiving 2017 for the start of his keto journey; 2018 would make a total of 3 or so months rather than 18. Not so important now, but down the road it may become confusing.)

Patrick
Guest
Patrick

My trigs went from 2.28mmol/L to 1.29mmol/L when I quit coffee. I also have (CYP1A2 – rs762551(A;C). I haven’t had a drop since and my last Trigs were 0.76mmol/L.

Bill Robinson
Guest

Maybe you meant Thanksgiving 2017?

shannon
Guest
shannon

Thank you and very interesting! As a coffee drinker with high HDL and very Low Trigs, I shall follow suit by cutting down. I am also LMHR, I would love to do that experiment on myself but the needles YIKES!

shannon
Guest
shannon

If anyone has had 23 and me done, you can look u how you respond to caffeine, if it is the caffeine having an effect…

Holly
Guest
Holly

Do you mind elaborating on how to use 23 and me to determine response to caffeine?

Tanya
Guest
Tanya

If not a LMHR but Keto is the effect the same?

Sean Brennan
Guest
Sean Brennan

I think there is wide individual variation… some people seem to not be affected the same way.

Peter Yan
Guest
Peter Yan

I believe it has something to do with the coffee oil.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/06/070614162223.htm

Angela Pearce
Guest
Angela Pearce

Is cafestol the issue? Any chance Sean would test this hypothesis by repeating trial using paper filters? PLEASE?

Jennifer k
Guest
Jennifer k

Drip vs. Press

In a 2004 edition of his medical newsletter, Dr. John McDougall describes the relationship between coffee and triglycerides. He points out that two chemicals found in coffee, cafestol and kahweol, can significantly raise blood cholesterol and triglycerides. The impact of these chemical is largely nullified, however, by the use of a paper coffee filter. This means that standard drip coffee, as prepared in many homes, restaurants and coffee shops—and permitted by many cholesterol testing facilities—is generally safe. Unfiltered, boiled coffee, such as the coffee produced by a French press, contains the harmful chemical

Joan
Guest
Joan

I find this interesting. I use a screened filter, not paper with a Keurig adding my own coffee not a pod. I drink almost all decaf, about 80% and add a bit of caffeinated. In my other cholesterol tests prior to LCHF, I had much lower triglycerides. My sister has a similar profile to me, but her triglycerides are lower. She drinks completely caffeinated coffee and multiple cups per day. Is is possible that the coffee causes some sort of vitamin deficiency?

William Healey
Guest
William Healey

Any alcohol consumption during this period?

Sean Brennan
Guest
Sean Brennan

I have not had alcohol since 10/30/2018 🙂

Richard McIntosh
Guest
Richard McIntosh

Perhaps compare with a caffeine pill?

Bill
Guest
Bill

As a counterpoint, I drink 20 oz of very strong dark roast coffee and another 20 oz of very strong decaf dark roast coffee every morning. My fasting triglycerides are under 40, sometimes as low as 20. For me, low carb + daily intermittent fasting + high intensity strength training are likely other relevant factors.

Bill
Guest
Bill

Also…I haven’t done the genetic test, but based on the all-day caffeine boost I get from early AM consumption I’m pretty sure I’m a slow metabolizer. Even at lunch caffeine can keep me up at night.

Kathy
Guest
Kathy

Me too. I can only drink it in the morning. This is the case with dark chocolate too.

Jason
Guest
Jason

I’d be curious to see if this also occurs with various teas…

BobM
Guest
BobM

Did he control for diet, exercise, length of fasting, and other factors that affect trigs?

I drink the same amount of coffee/green tea every day, and my trigs have varied from very low to high, and the main factor I can discern was the amount of fasting I did in the days/weeks prior to the test.

I’d prefer to see that he (1) at exactly the same things (2) at the same times and (3) had the exact same amount and type of exercise and at the same time, while having or not having coffee. Otherwise, as Dave’s own data shows, these numbers are so highly variable, that coffee may or may not be the cause.

Deborah L Kolesar
Guest
Deborah L Kolesar

Hi Bob, interested in what effect fasting had on your cholesterol panel, ie Total Cholesterol, HDL, LDL and Trig. I’m at 4 days fasted and wondering if I should test. Thanks, Debbie

Tpate
Guest
Tpate

This is so helpful! I am not a coffee fan but negan drinking bullet proof coffee on Keto and saw my tri increase significantly recently. While I like the coffee, I prefer lower tri! Tp

Brenda Zorn
Guest

Currently in a very strict Phase 1 of a 6 week Carnivore/caffeine experiment. I am using a protocol set up for me by Siobhan Huggins . 2 weeks steak/water, 2 weeks steak/coffee, 2 weeks steak/decaf. 6 consecutive weeks, full panels before, after, inbetween.
In 2017, whilst I participated in a 30 day steak challenge with my friend Donna Lordi, Dave and I observed an alarming jump in my triglycerides from 90 to 560. We discuss it in a 2KetoDudes podcast. We are replicating my conditions now. So steak-only again this time.
http://2ketodudes.com/show.aspx?episode=70

Dave
Admin

I’m very excited to see your upcoming data, Brenda. 🙂

Fernando
Guest
Fernando

Hi, is the data in? I’ve been on carnivore (beef, eggs, sardines / 0 carbs / 0 dairy) for 2 months and trigs went from 80 to 174 (13 hour fast). When I was on a more keto diet (meat, eggs, cheese, cream, butter, avocados) I always drank coffee (3 / 4 cups a day) and trigs were at a steady 80. My insulin requirements (I’m a T1 diabetic) have dropped in half during this carnivore diet. I now use a total of 6-7 insulin units a day, that’s including basal and boluses for meals. Thanks. Note: I swtched from regular drip coffee with paper filter to nespresso pods 4 days before this last test.

Sarah
Guest
Sarah

I wonder if he ever tested his insulin levels. Coffee is very high in salicylates, and those sensitive to salicylates can produce excessive insulin (and excessive insulin can impact triglycerides). My husband, who was mostly carnivore, removed coffee, tea, and no longer has the occasional berries and avocados, and now has now broke through his weight loss plateau. Other symptoms have improved as well (though there was a bad withdrawal period similar to SSRI withdrawal). So I’d be curious as to any other tests done as well, and what the author’s daily diet looked like.

Sean Brennan
Guest
Sean Brennan

My fasted insulin levels were 2.6 on 10/05/2018 and 1.0 on 12/07/2018… my most recent tests

Elaine Trace
Guest
Elaine Trace

That is very interesting. I switched to caffeine free coffee. I was having full blown panic attacks and anxiety ! I tried to find info and all I found was it causes mild withdrawal. I was freaked out. I saw my doctor about it thinking I was going crazy. Didn’t want to “try” drugs. Is there any research out there that explains it ?

Ryan
Guest
Ryan

I believe I have seen where people have posted their lab results and Dave has made comments/recommendations. Is that something you are interested in and if so where would I post mine? Thank you

Sean Brennan
Guest
Sean Brennan

You could check out the facebook groups… Dave does not comment on every post but their are a lot of smart people in there. Also, if you participate in the group for a little while you begin to see patterns and will get up to speed quickly.

Kathy
Guest
Kathy

. I love my cup of coffee in the morning.

Ray
Guest
Ray

I never did drink coffee or tea and I historically got my caffeine from Diet Coke. I have recently cut back on the Diet Coke and now I take a caffeine pill if I need a boost. Let,s face it, the reason coffee is so popular is because of the caffeine boost it gives. I have not done caffeine and trig testing. However, it is very likely that I did each of my blood tests food fasted for at least 14 hours and I would have had about 1 liter of Diet Coke each day before the blood draw in the afternoon and my trigs have always been under 50 mg/dL. I make this comment just to add support to the theory that it is not the caffeine that is raising you trigs.

Alan P
Guest
Alan P

Great info will try the no caffine days before my next bloodwork and see what happens to my Trigs.

Jeffery M Morgan
Guest
Jeffery M Morgan

It is really great to do some experiments on our self rather than just relying to established medical information. Well, there is not sense to reinvent the well but when in it comes to health, I guess it still is best that we really know our own health factors.

–Jeff Morgan–
https://caffeinetreat.com

Alex11
Guest
Alex11

I have a bulks and bulks of puer cakes tea both green and black. When i finish it or rather give it away in the proper hands – i have no further intention to by new cakes coz i dunno how it affect my metabolism regardless even considering the fact chinese tea was a great deal and passion and big chunk of my culture for me for years, i even study chinese because of this. But i have even greater passion for my health. So no more tea, alas.

Alex11
Guest
Alex11

Alas, we didnt realy know if it something to do with caffeine itself or some solids in coffe-bean and random components of final product as well. So we need to know what happened if you drink just plain tablet caffeine to the purity of the expirement – too pity author didnt include this in his study.

Peter
Guest
Peter

Might have something to do with cafestol. Here’s one of the research done on cafestol and serum tryglycerides…………https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/73/1/45/4729662

Eric
Guest
Eric

Do we have any data on the effect of Tea on triglycerides? I’m giving up coffee for now anyway and I drink a lot of green and black tea during the day. Thanks

fourscore
Guest

Mostly curious if Remnants followed Trigs as well? Coffee vs none or even tea…

sharron
Guest
sharron

This is so interesting, as my cholesterol shot up quite a bit since last year, although everything else is WNL. A few months ago, I started drinking dark coffee from keurig maker (no paper filter). Will abstain a couple of days before my next blood test just to see if it makes a difference. Not very scientific, but still curious.

AlisonJane
Guest
AlisonJane

Have you experimented with niacin before a fasted blood test? I was wondering that it might be of use in the protocol.
Also I was wondering about flax seed oil – I have read that it it very ketogenic so I wondered if it might also be of use somewhere in the protocol?

Mickey
Guest
Mickey

(1) i’ve been in ketosis for 3 years; (2) I’ve consistently had high triglycerides (150-200 range) and fairly low HDL (less than 50); (3) I drink a ton of coffee (4) I have the same gene as Sean CYP1A2 ; therefore

(5) i’m giving up coffee and retesting. in fact, I just had a test while still on coffee, so I’ll have comparative results.

Only question is, my genetics company Vitagene says that the CYP1A2 gene indicates FAST caffeine metabolism, not slow.

“Caffeine metabolism is the rate at which your body processes caffeine.Based on your genetics, you eliminate caffeine from your body quickly. This means that you may feel the effects of caffeine for a shorter period of time and you may tend to drink more caffeinated beverages, such as coffee. Because caffeine doesn’t stay in your body for very long, you are at lower risk than slow metabolizers for some of the adverse effects such as hypertension.”

I find that to be true, I can (and do) drink coffee well into the afternoon with no sleeplessness. I also have low blood pressure and no indications of hypertension.

Here is their citation regarding the gene: https://www.geneticsmr.com/articles/6221

A real Sherlock Holmes mystery perhaps close to a solution … Love this website!

Mickey
Guest
Mickey

Sorry, I have the CYP1A2 A;A allele (fast caffein metabolism). Sean indicates he has A;C, which is the minor allele and slow. So that’s not an issue. Will check back after two weeks off of coffee …

Cindy
Guest
Cindy

Thank you for your research!!
I am in shock! I have had very high triglycerides for ten years, ever since having my son. My last reading before yesterday was from 2017-11 and was 11.58 mmol/L which I think equals 1025 mg/DL. This was down from my highest reading in 2010 after having my daughter, of 16.79 mmol/L or 1487 mg/DL! (I do not drink alcohol and this was on regular SAD diet. I have always preferred eating carbs over eating protein).
For the past 2 wks I cut out all coffee, and I had my blood work done yesterday. I was so excited to see that my triglycerides are down to 4.74 mmol/L or 419 mg/DL! I have not seen them below 789 mg/DL anytime in the past ten years!
Also, my ALT and AST numbers are much better.
I hate to give up coffee but that difference is remarkable!!
Thank you for suggesting that coffee could be an issue.
I am going to get serious about doing low carb. I am scared to do high fat with already having what are still high trigs. I was also thinking I should try to do some fasting.
Would love any feedback or suggestions you may have. I really want to start feeling better, even if I have to give up my beloved coffee!
Thanks!!!

Alex11
Guest
Alex11

So i made my job. I had 2-weeks expirement with 6 total measurments of my TG levels durning acute Puer “tea cakes added phase”. I drank my best Puer Cackes both green and black to make sure i have a proper dosage of polyphenol and caffeine in me (and dont forget Puer tea its not just ordinar tea we drink – its very strong and have obvious effect). Result are surprising for me – i have ZERO effect on TG levels – just my regular keto only-water-numbers. I have my labs and everything but i dont think we need another seperate article on this topic and everyting – i bet we have a very few Puer tea lovers in our community.

David C.
Guest
David C.

So I started the carnivore deit back in June of 2018, and after a month on the deit I got my blood drawn. I was pretty freaked out cause my numbers seemed way off.
Total 271. Ldl 192. HDL. 31. Trig’s. 270. I did comment on another post and u told me to quit coffee for two weeks. Haha well it took me a couple months to finally get that to happen! I just got my blood drawn and got the results back today after a month of carnivore and no coffee and my numbers are total 258. Ldl. 197. HDL. 37. Trig’s 108. I feel like I am pretty happy with the results, any input or if these numbers should be better ? Also just a side note, I had insulin checked too and it was 5.6. I don’t know what ideal would be for that range either. Thanks for any feedback and thanks so much for the suggestions. I feel like u guys are saving lives.

meghal
Guest
meghal

+1, Same observation, my trigs were stubborn though swinging between 580-120 and in january I had a check that gave trigs of 480. I suspected either this was due to a large fatty meal ~2500 cal the night before the test (~14 hour fasting), or it could be coffee. I let go of coffee for last month and had a check again, I also eat ~1400cal meal night before the check. To my surprise, the trigs went to 55, which I haven’t seen before, the lowest I went was 120.

I am slowest coffee metabolizer due to gene CYP1A2 C:C, I guess the coffee was the culprit.

Jasmine
Guest
Jasmine

Thanks for this! I’m glad you included decaf coffee in your experiment.

trfernandez1
Guest
trfernandez1

I went low carb in Feb 2018 lost about 10 lbs then went keto in July 2018 and lost another 10+ lbs so down to a 25.5 bmi now. 1st lab done 01/18/19 (TC 377, LDL 286, HDL 57, TGL 169), even though I had already learned alot from Dave, Siobhan, Ivor, Phinney and the others I was still a little freaked and of course my doc was pressing hard for a statin. I thought this coffee hypothesis might apply to me so I tried it by eliminating all coffee and caffeine for 6+ weeks and I made a significant effort to increase my omega 3’s and moderately reduced my red meat intake. I also moderately increased my physical activity. 2nd lab done 03/15/19 (TC 376, LDL 289, HDL 66, TGL 92). Now my trig/hdl ratio is much better but I’m still trying to get a grasp on my overall risk. In between these two labs (02/27/19) I had an advanced panel done:
LDL Particle #: 2074
APOA1: 177
HSCRP: .9
Glucose: 91
A1c: 4.6

Kind of funny but sad but when I asked the doc for the advanced panel tests he was pretty much unaware of them and apparently this was the first time he had ever ordered them (I actually had to get him the test codes from Quest Diagnostics website) and he runs a very busy practice here in the Corona area.

Anyways it seems pretty obvious that the coffee and/or caffeine was spiking my trigs big time.

Lastly, I just want to say thanks to Siobhan and Dave for taking the time and making the effort to do what you do!

I’d really be interested in your thoughts on my numbers.

Thanks again!

Dave
Admin

Hi TR–

Not much to say. Your last panel is actually pretty close to how mine looks on keto! All your non-lipid numbers look good. And of course, you have given us yet one more data point on coffee. Thanks!

Max McCurry
Guest
Max McCurry

I drink at least 30 cups of coffee each day, and I have done so for the past 2 years. My most recent blood test on 19 March 2019 measured my triglycerides at 34 mg/dL and HDL was 84 mg/dL and ApoB was 56 mg/dL. I eat a strict keto diet with carb intake of no more than 20-30g/day.

Dave
Admin

Yeah — once again proving the individuality of it!

David C
Guest
David C

Dave F, I find your experiments interesting. I see you concentrate the Keto diet just on the lipid profiles without pointing out the effects on other organs and metabolic functions. What about showing glucose, liver enzymes, kidney function, etc. Another concern I have is your fats and carbs are dead foods. What about live sugars like you get from fruits and live oils you get from extra virgin olive oil, avocado oils, coconut oil, etc that are added to the meal rather than heated up. Live sugars and oils are high energy vs the low energy dead stuff your photos present such as grains, processed meats, and fried meat.

Dave
Admin

Thanks for your thoughts, David. I track a very large spectrum of tests with each new experiment. Not just glucose, liver enzymes, kidney — but even hormones, inflammatory markers, etc.

Much of the foods I eat are for experiments, but I try to avoid lots of processed oils.

David C
Guest
David C

Thanks Dave. I try to consume good sugars from fruit, good oils, and proteins from fatty fish. I am not completely keto, but would like to hear more about the other metabolic and hormone changes you are seeing. Such as a particular hormone shifted from X to Y.

Don
Guest
Don

Dramatic results for me too. LCHF since 12/5/2018, switched from coffee to tea on 4/6/2019, so this represents only six days with no coffee. I have the slow caffeine metabolism genetics. I did drink black coffee on the mornings of my blood tests except for this latest one.

date trig hdl ldl total remnant
12/5/2018 129 48 197 271 26
12/19/2018 142 54 207 289 28
1/28/2019 134 55 230 312 27
3/29/2019 129 55 218 299 26
4/12/2019 50 72 166 248 10

Richard Lee
Guest
Richard Lee

That is amazing Don! Not only the trig, but it seems like everything else is better! I’m a coffee guy, and I have blood work coming up in a few weeks! I’m going to stop coffee for at least a week before the test. I don’t have a clue about my coffee-DNA, but I’m not taking any chances!
Cheers,
Rich

Don
Guest
Don

I’m amazed too. Evidently coffee negated the gains I otherwise made via diet. (BTW I was wrong about slow caffeine metabolism. The relevant SNP is rs762551(A;C), normal caffeine metabolism.) What’s intriguing is that coffee never seems to prove to be a big risk factor, so presumably my condition is either a) rare or b) benign. Dave’s experience would seem to disprove a), and yet everything we know says that high triglyceride levels and remnant cholesterol are bad. Very puzzling. There would appear to be an important paper in this area. Good luck on your next lipid panel!

Richard Lee
Guest
Richard Lee

It actually worked for me on my last test. I had read about the coffee effect before my last panel and took a break from coffee. On 2/5/2019 and I got the best trig score ever.

6/11/14 126
9/16/14 139
8/18/15 162
2/17/16 189
8/19/16 152
2/18/17 183
8/21/17 128
2/7/18 123
7/30/18 104
2/5/19 70

Jason Skinner
Guest
Jason Skinner

Don,

What kinda tea? My Trigs go nuts on coffee as well and I was thinking about trying the tea route. I have a Keurig now that just collects dust so I’m not sure if you have found tea k-cups or just the normal bag soak? I am interested to hear what kind of tea you are drinking since getting your lowest Trig score.

Joseph Van Orden
Guest
Joseph Van Orden

In January I took a blood test after being on a low carb diet for 6 months and losing 23 pounds. I was excited to get my results. I was stunned to have high Triglycerides “299”. I expected the high LDL Cholesterol “133”.

I read this article and the results made sense, but I have never had a drink of coffee in my life. But I did have two very large Diet Mt. Dew’s the two days previous. I decided to go a month without drinking soda and test again. In April, I had a second test. Triglycerides dropped to “121”! The LDL went up to “148”, but I am not surprised because I am still on the low carb diet.

I am curious to know if anyone else has seen their Triglycerides jump from diet drinks with large amounts of caffeine? I probably had 48 ounces the two days prior to the first test.

Jason Skinner
Guest
Jason Skinner

Thanks for the info I had the same results with coffee. I nearly quit Carnivore before I read this thread and tested it for myself. Pretty crazy actually. I am a carrier of the APOE4 gene and would like to know if the author does as well?? I guess my coffee days are over, although I did finish the grounds I had left in the house. I will miss it….

March 2nd – Trigs: 176 (full board coffee)
March 19th – Trigs: 141 (no coffee little over 2 weeks)
April 2nd – Trigs: 171 (back on coffee)
May 6th – Trigs: 52 (no coffee for 30 days)

Steven Hailstone
Guest
Steven Hailstone

For me, coffee isn’t a factor, but coconut oil is, if used in bullet proof coffee. I have cut back significantly on CO since realizing this.

Richard Beaumont
Guest
Richard Beaumont

Anyone reporting blood glucose response to coffee?
I am generally sticking to a LCHF diet and have been watching my blood sugars. The other morning I had 3 cups (french press, with a little milk), and felt a bit wobbly…checked my sugars and they were at 131, very high for me. I repeated again this morning. When I woke up, 94, then after two coffees (my normal dose), shot up again to over 130. No breakfast either time as I seldom eat before lunch. So my question is, aside from the triglycerides, has anyone noticed a significant blood sugar response to coffee? I am going to try black coffee, black tea, and plain water over the next few days. Quite alarming. PS I went to the gym then a protein shake with plain yogurt, and an hour after that the blood sugars were at a happy 81.

Livvymom
Guest
Livvymom

I have been lchf for almost 14 months, lost 65 pounds, at a BMI of 23, and it has been a transformative experience. Unfortunately, I have the coffee sensitivity which causes a 4-fold increase in triglycerides.
Dave has noticed that this coffee sensitivity tends to exist in people who have relatively high HDL, even with high triglycerides. Would He consider analyzing the NHANES data to measure the mortality of the high HDL, high triglycerides folks (perhaps with some stratification for LDL values?)
I miss coffee more than I miss any carbohydrate. I would appreciate seeing data that hones in on this “subtype.”
Thanks!

Ricardo
Guest
Ricardo

Short question, guys. Coffee influence occurs only on trigs? Anyone related changes on LDL?
Thanks.

Bill
Guest
Bill

Is the case the same with instant coffee, I drink about 5 cups a day.
My last trig was 0.7 mmol/l down from 1.4 after going low carb.

Timo
Guest
Timo

I wonder from where the triglys come into bloodstream if otherwise you eat as before? And where do they go? Not from coffee I suppose? Adipose tissue ? Liver ?