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Aug 23

Low Carb USA 2017 – Presentation Video

Here’s the video of my presentation at Low Carb USA. I’ve already posted on the ApoE4 group that sponsored it and the many amazing events surrounding the conference.

In this video, I was able to do a much deeper dive in the beginning, to better help the audience understand the nature of the lipid system and the importance of “ride sharing” for lipoproteins — in layman’s terms. 🙂

Special note: In case you thought this week hit its quotas for blog posts, just wait until you see what we have coming in tomorrow…

4 comments

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  1. SallyLaughs

    Just a comment, I do not eat pork or shellfish at all and I would love to be able to compare those who do to those who don’t especially since the keto group pushes pig bacon so hard. I believe our bodies are designed to eat certain animals and not others (some are food and some are not food just like poison ivy is not food but broccoli is). The okay animals are: fish with fins and scales (so no shellfish or calamari or whales or shark), animals that both chew the cud and have a split hoof (not pig, not monkey, not dogs, not rabbit, not possum, not bears). and only certain insects like grasshoppers (but I have never eaten one that I know of haha). Its based on scriptures in the bible – Leviticus 11 and Deuteronomy 14. I am not trying to bring religion into it as much as asking what if this is correct info and we aren’t getting the full benefit of our health. My son and I did a Science fair using petri dishes and swabs of meat to ask which is better for you beef or pork and he won Best of Show! We looked at things under the microscope and did a lot of research and it seems scientifically on a very low scale test, pork is nasty stuff. For whatever its worth…

    1. Dave

      Pretty interesting, Sally. Yes, it would be cool to see if your data provided any difference in regards to lipids relative to the pork and shellfish diets.

  2. Myrto Ashe

    I watched this video, and I am a bit puzzled. As a functional medicine physician, I play with people’s blood glucose and lipid panels for a living. I recommend diets and I watch things change. I will definitely give people a heads up to stick to their diet very closely for the 5 days before a NMR test.

    But here is my question: We start with the understanding that ApoE4 carries fat and is inflammatory (so might lead to many long term issues that come about as a result of chronic inflammation), and so we recommend that patients with ApoE4 reduce animal saturated fat and coconut fat to optimize lipid parameters (reduce LDL-P and sdLDL).

    There is no discussion of this in your blog. I heard you say that your carotids are clean – how about markers of inflammation? Doesn’t ApoE4 turn on our inflammatory genes? Does this not matter if your diet is ketogenic?

    My personal experience (very superficial I now realize) is of a 25% drop in LDL-P and sdLDL and also TG when I replaced coconut oil with avocado oil. Unfortunately I also did something else at the same time, which was 3 rounds of the fasting mimicking diet, which eliminated my insulin resistance.

    Dr. Gundry says cheese (which he says ApoE4 people love inordinately) will blow up your LDL-P and needs to be avoided at least for 3 days before your test if you want nice numbers. In my experience (which needs to be more tightly controlled, I now see) most patients drop their lipid numbers on a high fat diet, except ApoE4 patients for whom it rises. I have felt that it is more related to high HbA1C in the average person on a SA diet. Once that is controlled, you get a number of other effects.

    Anyways, sorry for the rambling. I am in the business of needing to give people advice and so I wonder about causing unanticipated harm with saturated fat via inflammation caused by ApoE4.

    1. Dave

      Hi Myrto—

      We start with the understanding that ApoE4 carries fat and is inflammatory (so might lead to many long term issues that come about as a result of chronic inflammation), and so we recommend that patients with ApoE4 reduce animal saturated fat and coconut fat to optimize lipid parameters (reduce LDL-P and sdLDL).

      I’m not sure if I agree that ApoE4 is specifically pro-inflammatory. I have many followers who are 4/X or 4/4 who are hyper-responders with very high LDLc/p, yet with extremely low inflammatory markers.

      There is no discussion of this in your blog. I heard you say that your carotids are clean – how about markers of inflammation? Doesn’t ApoE4 turn on our inflammatory genes? Does this not matter if your diet is ketogenic?

      My liver enzymes are normal or optimal. AST, ALT within range, hsCRP typically <1.0. Normal CMP, CDC, etc. The one thing I haven’t been able to isolate is my higher Ferritin numbers (though I have normal iron panels and no genetic hemochromatosis) — so technically, that could be inflammatory, but it could also be genetic.

      Per my point above, I don’t believe ApoE4 is *independently* inflammatory. It may be that it has more aggressive processes compared to E2 and E3 alleles, but that is a question more of outcome of response than origin of the problem.

      My personal experience (very superficial I now realize) is of a 25% drop in LDL-P and sdLDL and also TG when I replaced coconut oil with avocado oil. Unfortunately I also did something else at the same time, which was 3 rounds of the fasting mimicking diet, which eliminated my insulin resistance.

      I think generally replacing SFA with PUFAs will reduce LDLc/p, but I don’t consider this a net benefit given the higher oxLDL outcomes as a result. For more on this I suggest reading/watching Chris Masterjohn’s content.

      Dr. Gundry says cheese (which he says ApoE4 people love inordinately) will blow up your LDL-P and needs to be avoided at least for 3 days before your test if you want nice numbers. In my experience (which needs to be more tightly controlled, I now see) most patients drop their lipid numbers on a high fat diet, except ApoE4 patients for whom it rises. I have felt that it is more related to high HbA1C in the average person on a SA diet. Once that is controlled, you get a number of other effects.

      I have a lot of compelling data at this point that ApoE4 status is a component of a resulting LDLc/p outcome, but actually a pretty small one overall (see my LCUSA presentation to ApoE4 group http://cholesterolcode.com/low-carb-usa-2017-presentation-video/). The biggest is existing composition of the diet (fat vs carbs) and body/health of the person (lean and/or athletic cholesterolcode.com/are-you-a-lean-mass-hyper-responder/).

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