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Jun 09

Cholesterol Code Workbook 2: The Mysterious Lipoprotein(a)

On this episode of the Cholesterol Code Workbook, we discuss five papers about the most mysterious lipoprotein: Lipoprotein(a). We discuss its involvement in wound healing, its role as a carrier for oxidized phospholipids, and potential influences on risk for cardiovascular disease.

Take a seat, grab a snack, and join us as we venture into the puzzling curiosities of lipoprotein(a)!

Studies and Figures mentioned in this episode:

Note: All images used are for the purpose of discussion and entertainment, all credit is given to the original authors. Figures come from the studies they are represented under.

A Test in Context: Lipoprotein(a): Diagnosis, Prognosis, Controversies, and Emerging Therapies

doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2016.11.042

New Insights Into the Role of Lipoprotein(a)-Associated Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2 in therosclerosis and Cardiovascular Disease

doi: 10.1161/01.ATV.0000280571.28102.d4

Oxidized Phospholipids, Lipoprotein(a), Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2 Activity, and 10-Year Cardiovascular Outcomes

doi: 10.1161/ATVBAHA.107.145805

Immunolocalization of Lipoprotein(a) in Wounded Tissues

doi: 10.1177/002215549704500408

Relationship between lipoprotein(a) concentrations and intima-media thickness a healthy population study

doi: 10.1177/1741826711423216

Other material mentioned:

Peter of Hyperlipid’s post on Bantu Lp(a) Levels

 

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Siobhan HugginsRoger JohnsonDougJo AnneDavid Recent comment authors

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Doug
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Doug

Dave,

I really appreciate all your work on this subject. I just discovered you as I recently embarked on a Keto diet. I’ve seen a number of your YouTube presentations and read many of your blog entries (I have listened to your appearance on the Keto For Normies podcast at least three times now) and I think at this point I understand the basics of cholesterol and its effects on people who follow LC/HF diets – even though I wasn’t born with the brain of an engineer. That’s to your credit, the way you present this incredibly complex information in an understandable way is impressive.
That said, and I know you hear this a lot, I think I may be one of those people who has seriously high LDL levels because of the, as you’ve put it ‘bad reasons’ (not dietary fat, heredity or something else).
If I’ve calculated it right, my Remnant Cholesterol number is pretty terrible. My HDL isn’t bad and my Triglycerides aren’t terrible – in fact my HDL/Tri ratio is ideal – but these LDL numbers are making me feel like you did when you first saw your own numbers and determined to learn more about how cholesterol works.
Here they are:
–==== CholesterolCode.com/Report v0.9.2 ====– 
…4 months on Keto (less than 20g carbs) ::: 22 hours water fasted… 
Total Cholesterol: 
493 mg/dL 
12.75 mmol/L 
LDL Cholesterol: 
294 mg/dL 
7.6 mmol/L 
HDL Cholesterol: 
96 mg/dL 
2.48 mmol/L 
Triglycerides: 
107 mg/dL 
1.21 mmol/L 

–CHOLESTEROL REMNANTS–
Remnant Cholesterol: 
103 mg/dL
2.66 mmol/L >>> High Risk Quintile
Remnant Chol to HDL:

1.07 >>> High Risk Quintile
Go to https://tinyurl.com/y8hokam2 for more on Cholesterol Remnants

–ATHEROGENIC INDEX OF PLASMA (AIP)–
AIP: -0.312 >>> Lowest Risk Third 
Go to https://tinyurl.com/ycccmmnx for more on Atherogenic Index of Plasma

–CONVENTIONAL MARKERS AND RATIOS–
Friedewald LDL-C: 376 | Iranian LDL-C: 345 
Total/HDL Ratio: 5.14 
TG/HDL Ratio in mg/dL: 1.11 | in mmol/L: 0.49

What I’m hoping to get from you is not medical advice – I understand the disclaimer – but some guidance on what to do next.

A quick bit of background – although I’ve been eating low-carb for more than five years or so now, I’ve really just recently started following a real Keto diet – I didn’t know much about tracking macros, moderating protein, being mindful about calories, making sure I got enough fat etc. until a few months ago.
I’m a 5’8”, 53-year-old male – reasonably lean when I started Keto – when I began the diet in earnest in February of this year I was at 20 % body fat – 159 lbs. I haven’t taken any new measurements since then, but I’ve noticed significant changes in my body composition, I’ve never felt better and going by the way my clothes fit, I’ve lost visceral fat all over, particularly that persistent pooch on my belly.
That’s where I was headed when I had an annual physical last week and I saw the numbers that are freaking me out. I should say, since I’ve been following an unstructured low-carb diet for years, I’ve had this argument with my physician about taking statins for at least two previous blood tests, and he’s indulged me so far and urged me to alter my diet (he doesn’t get it), but these latest LDL numbers have convinced him this is genetic. And, he may be right, I’m afraid. Since I was adopted, I have no family history to go on, so I’m trying to be as cautious as I can. That’s the reason I chose not to do the Feldman protocol for this blood test, as I’d like to get a real sense of the numbers. I’ve considered taking it again with the protocol, but I’m not sure what that will accomplish.
I’m thinking I should have a calcium scan and an NMR particle test, but I don’t see any way around this except for altering my Keto diet or just taking the statin.

Just so you have enough data, here are my cholesterol numbers from two previous tests:

January, 2016
Total 325
HDL 72
LDL 217
Tri 110

April, 2013
Total 350
HDL 84
LDL 200
Tri 162

If you’re still reading this (I am sorry this is so long), what do you think? I really appreciate you taking the time.

Best,

Doug in Salt Lake City

David
Guest
David

Haha I tried to keep up with this presentation, super interesting. Had a couple of questions I could be way off. If you had low HDL and higher triglycerides, do you think your body would produce more lp(a) to get ride of the oxidation caused my that and act as an hdl to remove the waste with a different pathway than the liver. (I’m probably way off in left field on this just a question )
Also if I just started lifting heavy weights and and my muscles are tearing and repairing bigger would that call for a bigger amount of lp(a) to help with the wound healing . Thanks guys love this stuff !

Jo Anne
Guest
Jo Anne

Is there any known relationship between an elevated CRP level and an elevated Lp (a)?